Frankincense has traveled across continents, found its place in many different cultures and religions, and has been used by humanity for thousands of years. At XTEND5 we believe that anything that has had that kind of longevity is worth paying attention to. So, what is Frankincense? And, what do studies, in this modern age, have to tell us about this oil, which was once said to rival the value of gold?1

Found in the dry and mountainous regions of Africa, India, and the Middle East, you will find a tree called the Boswellia. The Boswellia tree is cut along the bark so that the oil resin, Frankincense, also known as “olibanum”, can seep from the tree like tears. The almost white oil resin is then harvested and distilled into the essential oil that has been used as a plant medicine for thousands of years.2

Chemically, Frankincense is rich in antiviral compounds, reduces stress and anxiety, and has a noted effect on inflammation. The active components of Frankincense possess antiseptic, astringent, digestive, and diuretic qualities.3 This means that it can have an impact on many organs and functions of the human body.

Frankincense is a grounding, fragrant and earthy essential oil which is rich in terpenes. Studies suggest that the oil can help people suffering from different forms of arthritis, and it is the Boswellic acid and terpenes which are responsible for many of its anti-inflammatory properties. It does this by preventing the release of leukotrienes, which are the active compounds that cause inflammation.4

Frankincense boasts an array of healing qualities, and there have been several studies that showed the effects that Frankincense oil could have on people who have asthma and other bronchial conditions. It found that 70% of patients experienced a noted improvement in their symptoms after being involved in a clinical trial.5 Frankincense has been used in traditional medicine for centuries, and the way it is used will only increase.6

This precious oil continues to prove its role in gut health too. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties studies have shown Frankincense to be a healing resource for people who suffer from chronic7 and ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s8 9 There are also conversations about the need for more research in connection with Lupus. This autoimmune disease affects the gut. In an article published by the International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology10, it states that Boswellia extract has immunomodulating effects, meaning it can stimulate or suppress the immune system, as well as having the positive anti-inflammatory benefits.11

When it comes to neurological health, it is being suggested that Frankincense has some psychoactive qualities that are said to interact with receptors in the brain, lighting them up and causing the central nervous system to experience a certain level of calm. It’s effects on the brain also are said to be antidepressive too. The oil resin is used as an incense in many cultures.12

As you can see, there is an abundance of positive reports about how Frankincense could help people, and the research continues. Progress is even being made in finding out just what compounds in Frankincense can affect cancer growth, bringing hope to sufferers of this disease.13

Frankincense is a therapeutic resource that is wildly valuable in traditional and holistic medicine, and this is why you will find it in our CBD and CBA products. It can bring healing to the body and prepares the gut to be able to absorb nutrients by reducing inflammation. In turn, this increases bioavailability, which is the key to absorbing all the nutrients we consume on a daily basis.

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1. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14888386.2017.1370390?scroll=top&needAccess=true&journalCode=tbid20
2. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/frankincense
3. http://www.ijnpnd.com/article.asp?issn=2231-0738;year=2012;volume=2;issue=2;spage=79;epage=79;aulast=Khan
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27117114
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9810030/
6. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/frankincense
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11488449
8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9049593
9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11215357
10. https://www.openaccessjournals.com/articles/can-a-plantderived-compound-provide-a-lupus-lifeline.pdf
11. https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/immunomodulating-agent
12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2493463/
13. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/8505251.stm

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